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Tag: brazil

Bolsonaro’s Brazil

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by Perry Anderson (Feb 2019)

I: Lula/Dilma

The teratology of the contemporary political imagination – plentiful enough: Trump, Le Pen, Salvini, Orbán, Kaczyński, ogres galore – has acquired a new monster. Rising above the ruck, the president-elect of Brazil has extolled his country’s most notorious torturer; declared that its military dictatorship should have shot thirty thousand opponents; told a congresswoman she was too ugly to merit raping; announced he would rather a son killed in a car accident than gay; declared open season on the Amazon rainforest; not least, on the day after his election, promised followers to rid the land of red riff-raff. Yet for Sérgio Moro, his incoming justice minister saluted worldwide as an epitome of judicial independence and integrity, Jair Bolsonaro is a ‘moderate’.

To all appearances, the verdict of the polls last October was unambiguous: after governing the country for 14 years, the Workers’ Party (PT) has been comprehensively repudiated and its survival may now be in doubt. Lula, the most popular ruler in Brazilian history, has been incarcerated by Moro and awaits further jail sentences. His successor, evicted from office midway through her second term, is a virtual outcast, reduced to a humiliating fourth place in a local Senate race. How has this reversal come about? To what extent was it contingent or at some point a foregone conclusion? What explains the radicalism of the upshot? By comparison with the scale of the upheaval through which Brazil has lived in the last five years, and the gravity of its possible outcome, the histrionics over Brexit in this country and the conniptions over Trump in America are close to much ado about nothing.

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“We don’t like Samba” – watch here

WATCH HERE

Until recently, Brazil was one of the shooting-stars of the BRIC states. But after a decade of economic growth, the social cement began to crumble. Many people can no longer see a better future in the credit-based boom of the past years. One year before the World Cup and three years before the Olympics came the big bang. The biggest mass movement in decades emerged after the costs for public transportation rose in June 2013. Inspired by that insurrection, social struggles are now spreading like woldfire: workers going on wildcat strikes, young women mobilizing against the visit of the Pope, people fighting against urbanization projects. And in many favelas, resistance against militarization and displacement is on the rise. “We are not samba dancers” say the striking garbage workers known as “Garis” in one interview. “We are rebels”. They and other rebels tell their story in this documentary: We don’t like Samba.

“We don’t like Samba” made its unofficial premiere at the Fusion Festival, on June 28th 2014. For more, info see wedontlikesamba.wordpress.com

“We don’t like Samba” Premiere: July 2, Berlin

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Liebe Freunde, Genossinnen und QueerOlenten!

Fast pünktlich zur WM: am Mittwoch den 02. Juli um 21h die Premiere von “We don´t like samba” OmU mit DT Untertiteln

Adresse: Direkt am Kotti zusammen mit Kotti & Co am Geçekondu. (Bei Regen im Südblock), anschließend Diskussion!

Trailer:

Englisch:

Portugiesisch:

Info:

Bis vor wenigen Jahren galt Brasilien als krisenfest und Shooting-Star der BRIC-Länder. Aber nur ein Jahr vor der Fußball-WM und drei Jahre vor den olympischen Spielen knallt es: Im Juni 2013 kommt es nach Fahrpreiserhöhungen im öffentlichen Nahverkehr zu den größten Massendemonstrationen seit Jahrzehnten. Inspiriert von den Aufständen verbreiten sich soziale Kämpfe wie ein Lauffeuer in Brasilien: Arbeiter_innen treten in wilde Streiks, junge Frauen mobilisieren gegen den Papstbesuch, Mega-Urbanisierungsprojekte werden angegriffen, Favelabewohner_innen wehren sich gegen Vertreibung und Militarisierung. “Wir sind keine Sambatänzer”, sagten die streikenden Müllmänner “Garis” in einem Interview, sondern “wir sind Rebellen”. Diese und andere Rebellen kommen in “We don´t like samba” zu Wort und erzählen ihre Geschichte.

Vandals! Vandals! Vandals!

Brazil is coming.